• Cultural Independence

    In the month of July, we as a nation, celebrate Independence Day. It is a celebration of the day Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, which we know now as the foundation to the place we call “land of the free”. However, the reality is blacks and African Americans were not included in the original 1776 celebration of emancipation. Many would argue we are not included in the modern celebration, despite our participation in the holiday and more importantly the development of this great country. Aren’t we American?.

    In light of recent events covered in the media, we can see the gap in how we are treated, policed, and judged. As if our citizenship does not carry the same weight. Ironically we pay for and buy into the same system which is allowing the mistreatment of African Americans by the three branches of government. Positioning us in a similar oppression to the colonist that fought for their freedom, “taxation without representation” is the reference colonist used.

    However, we are not separated by any major ocean. We share the same land, so independence for African Americans living in America will look different than it did for colonist. Sovereignty in this case will look more like cultural independence. A big part of defining a culture’s independence is by starting from the root of what makes this body of people one culture. For us in America, this root must have a stronger narrative than the story of an enslaved people we are force fed. The root must also include a collective recognition of the needs, wants, and identity of the culture, despite how it may differ from our American counterparts. Cultural independence is also rooted in having more control of our resources. We see other examples of it here an America, such as immigrant established towns. These towns are for the people and by the people that it represents. They often own the property and land in these communities, are the major business owners, and have an unwritten moral and ethical code which is followed by the citizens, whether residing or visiting. This is the first step to independence for the black and brown people of the United States of America

    It is a celebration of the day Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, which we know now as the foundation to the place we call “land of the free”. However, the reality is blacks and African Americans were not included in the original 1776 celebration of emancipation Cultural Independence

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